Arquivo de 8 de Fevereiro, 2008

WPP 2008- Grande Prémio no Vale da Morte

um-homem-no-fim-da-linha.jpg

“Esta imagem mostra um homem exausto. E uma nação exausta”.

Foi assim que o júri classificou esta fotografia do fotógrafo britânico Tim Hetherington, que lhe valeu o primeiro prémio World Press Photo 2008.
O trabalho, para a Vanity Fair, no Afeganistão, mostra este soldado norte-americano num bunker em Korengal.

Gary Knight, presidente do júri, diz que se trata de uma imagem de “um homem no fim da linha”. “Estamos todos ligados a esta imagem.” Foto: Tim Hetherington

fonte: Público

A foto premiada foi publicada na edição de Janeiro de 2008 da Vanity Fair no artigo Into the Valley of Death, que inclui um slideshow com a foto-reportagem. O fotógrafo Tim Hetherington e Sebastian Junger, que captou este vídeo, falam sobre o que encontraram no Afeganistão.

WPP 2008- Grande Prémio no Vale da Morte

um-homem-no-fim-da-linha.jpg

“Esta imagem mostra um homem exausto. E uma nação exausta”.
Foi assim que o júri classificou esta fotografia do fotógrafo britânico Tim Hetherington, que lhe valeu o primeiro prémio World Press Photo 2008.
O trabalho, para a Vanity Fair, no Afeganistão, mostra este soldado norte-americano num bunker em Korengal.

Gary Knight, presidente do júri, diz que se trata de uma imagem de “um homem no fim da linha”. “Estamos todos ligados a esta imagem.” Foto: Tim Hetherington

fonte: Público

Esta foto foi publicada na edição de janeiro de 2008 da Vanity Fair, neste artigo:

(mais informação, aqui e aqui.)

Into the Valley of Death

A strategic passage wanted by the Taliban and al-Qaeda, Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley is among the deadliest pieces of terrain in the world for U.S. forces. One platoon is considered the tip of the American spear. Its men spend their days in a surreal combination of backbreaking labor—building outposts on rocky ridges—and deadly firefights, while they try to avoid the mistakes the Russians made. Sebastian Junger and photographer Tim Hetherington join the platoon’s painfully slow advance, as its soldiers laugh, swear, and run for cover, never knowing which of them won’t make it home.

by Sebastian Junger January 2008

The 20 men of Second Platoon move through the village single file, keeping behind trees and stone houses and going down on one knee from time to time to cover the next man down the line. The locals know what is about to happen and are staying out of sight. We are in the village of Aliabad, in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, and the platoon radioman has received word that Taliban gunners are watching us and are about to open fire. Signals intelligence back at the company headquarters has been listening in on the Taliban field radios. They say the Taliban are waiting for us to leave the village before they shoot.

Below us is the Korengal River and across the valley is the dark face of the Abas Ghar ridge. The Taliban essentially own the Abas Ghar. The valley is six miles long, and the Americans have pushed halfway down its length. In 2005, Taliban fighters cornered a four-man navy-seal team that had been dropped onto the Abas Ghar, and killed three of them, then shot down the Chinook helicopter that was sent in to save them. All 16 commandos on board died.

Dusk is falling and the air has a kind of buzzing tension to it, as if it carries an electrical charge. We only have to cover 500 yards to get back to the safety of the firebase, but the route is wide open to Taliban positions across the valley, and the ground has to be crossed at a run. The soldiers have taken so much fire here that they named this stretch “the Aliabad 500.” Platoon leader Matt Piosa, a blond, soft-spoken 24-year-old lieutenant from Pennsylvania, makes it to a chest-high stone wall behind the village grade school, and the rest of the squad arrives behind him, laboring under the weight of their weapons and body armor. The summer air is thick and hot, and everyone is sweating like horses. Piosa and his men were here to talk to the local elder about a planned water-pipe project for the village, and I can’t help thinking that this is an awful lot of effort for a five-minute conversation.

I’m carrying a video camera and running it continually so that I won’t have to think about turning it on when the shooting starts. It captures everything my memory doesn’t. Piosa is about to leave the cover of the stone wall and push to the next bit of cover when I hear a staccato popping sound in the distance. “Contact,” Piosa says into his radio and then, “I’m pushing up here,” but he never gets the chance. The next burst comes in even tighter and the video jerks and yaws and Piosa screams, “A tracer just went right by here!” Soldiers are popping up to empty ammo clips over the top of the wall and Piosa is shouting positions into the radio and tracers from our heavy machine guns are streaking overhead into the darkening valley and a man near me shouts for someone named Buno.

Buno doesn’t answer. That’s all I remember for a while—that and being incredibly thirsty. It seems to go on for a long, long time.
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